grant-kendrell:

destroy the notion that someone’s mental health is what makes them evil.

destroy the notion that mental illnesses make bad people.

destroy the notion that you can’t be an outright awful person without being mentally ill.

destroy the notion that neurotypical people can do no harm.

destroy ableism.

bromancing-the-stone:

The most ignored words in the world.

bromancing-the-stone:

The most ignored words in the world.

Reblog if you think girls can have short hair and still be feminine.

countesscruella:

akriggle15:

burnt-black-wings:

My headteacher wants to introduce a rule saying girls can’t have hair shorter than chin length because it’s unfeminine. She said if I can show her 150 urls of people who agree with me then she won’t put the rule forward.

SIGNAL BOOST

Some people’s hair does not even grow that long. That rule will make girls with hair that doesn’t grow much in length feel terrible.
clauhatena:

zachafalse:

the-absolute-best-gifs:

lunaticcrimsonmerc:

I am crying on the floor.

hE JUST STARTS DANCING AND THEN EVERYONES LIKE AW YEAH ITS COOL MAN

clauhatena:

zachafalse:

the-absolute-best-gifs:

lunaticcrimsonmerc:

image

I am crying on the floor.

hE JUST STARTS DANCING AND THEN EVERYONES LIKE AW YEAH ITS COOL MAN

eristhegoddessofchaos:

catflop:

uf0s:

mother loaf chirping to tipsy babies

I thought chirping was an exaggeration but no. no that is actually a chirp

mother loaf

awwwww, the kitties!!!!

stopitsgingertime:

the hogwarts section on yik yak is so important

stopitsgingertime:

the hogwarts section on yik yak is so important

endureandsurviving:

y’all motherfuckers need kingdom hearts

only-1-a:

amaterasu-serenity:

DEAR EVERYONE

NEVER EVER TOUCH A WRITER/ARTIST/ANYONE’S PERSONAL NOTEBOOK. DO NOT GRAB IT 

DO NOT GRAB IT AND TAKE IT

DO NOT TAKE IT

DO NOT TAKE IT

DO NOT LOOK THROUGH IT WITHOUT THEIR EXPLICIT AND CONSISTENT PERMISSION

THERE IS A REASON IT IS THEIR PERSONAL NOTEBOOK AND NOT THEIR PUBLIC EVERYONE GRAB IT NOTEBOOK

I DON’T CARE IF YOU ARE JUST PICKING IT UP TO SEE SOMETHING I AM SHOWING TO YOU


DO NOT TOUCH IT

The writer has permission to backhand you with the book if you do.

Why do white people own so many pets?
Because we’re not allowed to own people anymore.
*****
What is the scariest thing about a white person in prison?
You know he did it.
*****
how many Chicago cops does it take to change a light bulb? None, they just beat the room for being black.”
*****
A good looking 50 year old white man is trying to get laid on reality TV. What show are you watching?
To catch a predator.
*****
Why do white girls travel in groups of three or five?
They can’t even
*****
What do you call 64 white people in a room? A full blooded Cherokee.

from various reddit threads

at dinner last night, a coworker was talking about hanging out with his white friends and getting fed up with the racist jokes, and asked them to tell a white people joke.  nobody had any, so he googled and found these. after a few of them, people were a lot less comfortable.

white folks, next time you hear a racist joke, maybe lead with one of these in response.  tag this “I’m white” when you reblog it, if you are.

(via cuterpillar)

on #Rift, my twitter and tumblr sign ins not working. But my itunes just went to “A Day Without Rain” by Enya as I go into a boss battle, and I’m like “ah yes, how nice, suiting battle music”

countesscruella:

youneedacat:

At The Back Of The North Wind was an extremely important book for me.  On the surface, it’s a fantasy story about a boy who gets approached by the North Wind, who takes him on adventures around the world (some exhilarating, some terrifying, some both), and then starts asking some things of him that are extremely difficult.
Under the surface, it’s George MacDonald trying to come to terms with the loss of his son, who the main character is modeled off of.
Some people might not like it because it has some Victorian novel clichés about sick kids.  I liked it a lot.  I felt like it spoke to some deeper experiences I was having as a result of severe, life-threatening illness.  Like even though it never said it outright, it talked about what it’s like to have death sitting in the room with you, waiting patiently for you to be ready.  And a number of other experiences that can only be sensed, not explained in language.  Which is what made George MacDonald such a genius of a writer — he could get at those places that can only be sensed, and do it with words.  
The story is beautiful, and chilling (as the North wind should be), and heartbreaking, and I related so much to it when I read it in the hospital on my Kindle.  It’s also free online just about everywhere, because it’s quite old and copyright doesn’t apply.
George MacDonald’s books are like… Madeleine L’Engle, or Michael Ende, or Diane Duane.   They always have deeper layers to them. layers of meaning you’re not going to see if you just look on the surface.  But you can feel them down there.  And they’re important layers.  They’re real things about the world that the book is trying to show you without being too obvious about it.  And these authors do it beautifully.
There is something about this book that just thoroughly and totally resonates with my experiences of delirium and life-threatening illness, even though those are not topics explicitly covered in the book.  They’re entirely done by metaphor and layers and stuff like that.
But I’d strongly recommend you give it a try, if you’re at all interested in these experiences.  Because… I don’t know how to explain, but it’s like it immerses you in feelings that are familiar from illness, without actually talking about the child ever being ill all that much, from what I remember.  It amazes me when an author has that kind of talent.  And maybe I’m talking this book up too much and you’ll be disappointed, but I find it hard to be disappointed by nearly anything George MacDonald has ever written.
I really need to reread this now that I’m out the other side.  There are so many books that got me through the “I might be dying” period — At the Back of the North Wind is one of them, The Fault in Our Stars was another, which I just reread as a book on tape, and saw the movie when it came out (the movie was disappointingly bland, but I’m still glad I went).  
I find that the Victorians understood things about sickness that we’ve forgotten these days now that we lock it up in hospitals and nursing homes.  They understood things about delirium, things about death, things about illness, because for better or worse they saw these things happening in front of them, there were no antibiotics, even a routine infection could result in both delirium and death.  
And it comes out in their novels, and I look for it, because I look for people who understand, even if they’ve been dead for over a hundred years, what does time have to do with it?   What matters is they understand things I’ve gone through that I can’t find any decent support for in modern times.  And this book was one of those books where I found understanding, even if the understanding was always under the surface somewhere where I couldn’t quite get at it.



Ohh, I had to read this book when I was a child (who had yet to experience illness firsthand) and hated it.  I didn’t even realize Diamond was sick.  I just thought it was a weird book about a kid whose father loved his horse more than his human child, and the North Wind took the child on weird adventures, and the child died from…  I honestly thought his adventures gave him pneumonia in the end or something.  I was the age of the main character when I read it, but didn’t understand it at all not did my friends.  My friends thought it was weird for the same reasons I did.  I should reread it as an adult, because I enjoyed all the other authors/books you spoke of for reasons you gave and I’m sure I’d see it differently now.

countesscruella:

youneedacat:

At The Back Of The North Wind was an extremely important book for me.  On the surface, it’s a fantasy story about a boy who gets approached by the North Wind, who takes him on adventures around the world (some exhilarating, some terrifying, some both), and then starts asking some things of him that are extremely difficult.

Under the surface, it’s George MacDonald trying to come to terms with the loss of his son, who the main character is modeled off of.

Some people might not like it because it has some Victorian novel clichés about sick kids.  I liked it a lot.  I felt like it spoke to some deeper experiences I was having as a result of severe, life-threatening illness.  Like even though it never said it outright, it talked about what it’s like to have death sitting in the room with you, waiting patiently for you to be ready.  And a number of other experiences that can only be sensed, not explained in language.  Which is what made George MacDonald such a genius of a writer — he could get at those places that can only be sensed, and do it with words.  

The story is beautiful, and chilling (as the North wind should be), and heartbreaking, and I related so much to it when I read it in the hospital on my Kindle.  It’s also free online just about everywhere, because it’s quite old and copyright doesn’t apply.

George MacDonald’s books are like… Madeleine L’Engle, or Michael Ende, or Diane Duane.   They always have deeper layers to them. layers of meaning you’re not going to see if you just look on the surface.  But you can feel them down there.  And they’re important layers.  They’re real things about the world that the book is trying to show you without being too obvious about it.  And these authors do it beautifully.

There is something about this book that just thoroughly and totally resonates with my experiences of delirium and life-threatening illness, even though those are not topics explicitly covered in the book.  They’re entirely done by metaphor and layers and stuff like that.

But I’d strongly recommend you give it a try, if you’re at all interested in these experiences.  Because… I don’t know how to explain, but it’s like it immerses you in feelings that are familiar from illness, without actually talking about the child ever being ill all that much, from what I remember.  It amazes me when an author has that kind of talent.  And maybe I’m talking this book up too much and you’ll be disappointed, but I find it hard to be disappointed by nearly anything George MacDonald has ever written.

I really need to reread this now that I’m out the other side.  There are so many books that got me through the “I might be dying” period — At the Back of the North Wind is one of them, The Fault in Our Stars was another, which I just reread as a book on tape, and saw the movie when it came out (the movie was disappointingly bland, but I’m still glad I went).  

I find that the Victorians understood things about sickness that we’ve forgotten these days now that we lock it up in hospitals and nursing homes.  They understood things about delirium, things about death, things about illness, because for better or worse they saw these things happening in front of them, there were no antibiotics, even a routine infection could result in both delirium and death.  

And it comes out in their novels, and I look for it, because I look for people who understand, even if they’ve been dead for over a hundred years, what does time have to do with it?   What matters is they understand things I’ve gone through that I can’t find any decent support for in modern times.  And this book was one of those books where I found understanding, even if the understanding was always under the surface somewhere where I couldn’t quite get at it.

Ohh, I had to read this book when I was a child (who had yet to experience illness firsthand) and hated it. I didn’t even realize Diamond was sick. I just thought it was a weird book about a kid whose father loved his horse more than his human child, and the North Wind took the child on weird adventures, and the child died from… I honestly thought his adventures gave him pneumonia in the end or something. I was the age of the main character when I read it, but didn’t understand it at all not did my friends. My friends thought it was weird for the same reasons I did. I should reread it as an adult, because I enjoyed all the other authors/books you spoke of for reasons you gave and I’m sure I’d see it differently now.
politicalsexkitten:

stunningpicture:

The camera angle they never show on TV

We the People.Fear the People.

politicalsexkitten:

stunningpicture:

The camera angle they never show on TV

We the People.
Fear the People.

fandomsandfeminism:

lizardvvizard:

representation-isms:

Do you ever get rly pissed because the hunger games films could’ve told such a deep story with themes that reflect our own society’s oppressive systems

but instead they whitewashed the main leads, erased their disabilities, and pretty much romanticized the violence

The degree to which THG movies play into exactly the things the story condemns will never not be staggering to me

image

nativeundercover:

Finally, I made myself a new fundraiser, with indiegogo this time.

More or less, exactly what it says on the label. I need a shit-tonne of money to pay for a wheelchair. The pain from walking is even worse now than during my original fundraiser (which was shut down due to the fact I can’t prove my identity adequately, which paypal requires as per bizarre Australian law, but now I’m using a different account).

If you can’t donate, please share.

Thank you.

cultureunseen:

Charda Gregory abducted, humiliated, violated, restrained, scalped and tortured. 
If this were reversed, with black police officers who were sworn to uphold peace and justice but instead were documented victimizing a white woman (who was already a victim), this news would have trumped the Olympics!

Truncated version: drugged at a party, abducted to a motel, wakes up during unwanted sexual violation in a motel room full of strangers, fights like hell to escape, motel employee calls the authorities, she gets arrested for destroying motel property and it just gets worst from there.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoBLolqUaNg 

Every officer who participated in it and even those who witnessed it and did nothing should be punished but instead they just fired the woman?
No rape kit, no police report on the people inside the motel room, no investigation of her claims, no accountability for missing motel entry records, no video from the motel but she gets detained for fourteen days?

(Btw, when did your tax dollars begin purchasing Abu Ghraib type water boarding chairs?)